Key Lime Pies in Jars for Two

We are not pie people. We’re Dominican, and pies aren’t a thing over there. In fact, my folks were introduced to pie here in the U.S. Luckily, while I do consider myself Dominican, I am American by default. I am forever trying to tie American culture with our Dominican heritage and most of the time, I fail. They’re just not used to those kinds of things; like that one time where I tried to have a “traditional” Thanksgiving dessert by adding a pie to the dinner table. It did not go over well, but that hasn’t stopped me from enjoying such desserts.

IMG_4126A

My folks were away for the past two weeks, leaving my sister and I to hold our own. It was fun and exciting to be “living alone” for two weeks, especially since we aren’t kids anymore. I spent a lot of time in the kitchen while they were gone, both messing around and actually cooking meals. I took the helm, making dinner several times for us when I wasn’t working. I even butchered (like, really butchered) a whole chicken on my own! I took advantage of the fact that they were gone to make stuff I’d been dying to eat.

Key lime pie has always sounded delicious to me. The older I got, the more I found I wanted to try it. It was number two on my grand list of desserts to try, but I ended up making that first. I saw this recipe somewhere on the internet the other day and was inspired. Like most of my decisions lately, this one began with a “fuck it.” It’s one of the ways I’ve been going about my decisions lately; considering I tend to procrastinate things I really wanna do. With that said, I made the pies.

KeyLimePieJars

I don’t know about you, but things in jars are just ten times more adorable. I have a few jars in my possession already but they’re all being used for other stuff. This meant I had to buy more jars; a labor of love, even if it may have hurt my pocket a little bit. I went to Sur la Table for the very first time, and I absolutely loved it! I went to the only one in the city and immediately fell in love upon walking in. I gotta be honest, I had been avoiding this trip for the longest because I knew I was gonna love it. The worst thing is going shopping with basically zero dollars, so I put it off as long as I could. I’m glad I went because I will no doubt will be back (with actual dollars in my pockets) to buy all of the things.

Jars in hand, it was pie time. This recipe is super simple and straightforward. I halved it so I could make just two jars. I’m the only dairy/pie eating fiend here, so the less the better. I tried looking for smaller cans of sweetened condensed milk but I couldn’t locate a can, so I used half of a regular can. After 15 minutes in the oven, and two and a half long hours of cooling and chilling, I got to try this pie for the first time. It is SO GOOD. The lime offsets the sweetness from the sweetened condensed milk, and the salty-ish crust adds crunch and a change of flavor.

IMG_4130A

I went to town on one of the jars immediately, and am holding on to the other one. My favorite thing about this dessert is the jar. It’s portable, meaning it’s perfect for picnics and romantic desserts for two. Or you could eat them both; no one’s around and I won’t tell 😉

Key Lime Pies in Jars for Two – adapted from Kitchen Treaty

Makes two small jars

Crust:

  • 1/2 cup graham cracker crumbs (about three graham cracker rectangles)
  • 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Filling:

  • 7oz sweetened condensed milk (from a 14oz can)
  • 1-2 teaspoons lime zest
  • 1/4 – 1/3 cup fresh lime juice (from 1-3 limes, depending on how juicy they are)
  • 1 egg yolk

Topping: 

  • 1-2 cups heavy cream
  • 1-3 tablespoons powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Lime zest and lime slices for garnish (optional)

Directions:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350F. Place the empty jars on a baking sheet.
  2. For the crust: crush the graham crackers in a resealable plastic bag with a rolling pin, or run the crackers through your food processor. Add the sugar and salt, and stir to combine. Add the melted butter and mix until moistened. Divide the graham cracker mixture equally between the jars. Do not compress the crust into the jars as you would a regular graham cracker crust; it’ll be difficult for the crust to come out of the jar with a spoon. Set aside.
  3. For the filling: zest and juice your limes in a medium sized bowl. Add the sweetened condensed milk and stir. Once combined, whisk in the egg yolk until mixture is homogenized.
  4. Divide the filling equally among the jars and bake on a baking sheet for about 15 minutes, or until filling is set. Cool jars on a rack for about 30 minutes, then move to the refrigerator for 2-3 hours or until completely chilled.
  5. Once chilled, make the whipped cream by mixing the heavy cream, sugar, and vanilla with an electric mixer until soft-medium peaks form. Top the pies with the cream, and garnish right before serving.

Lucy’s Tips:

  • If you find small cans of sweetened condensed milk (lucky!) by all means, use them. If not, half a 14oz can of sweetened condensed milk is a little over 1/2 cup. If you’re a stickler for accuracy (like I am), weigh out the 7oz using a food scale
  • Jars will keep in the fridge for up to three days (if they last that long); just top and garnish before serving
  • Before baking, make sure your jars are clean, oven safe, and do not have any chips or cracks anywhere on the surface
Advertisements

Coconut Lime Scones

Summer has entered the building. I don’t know, I feel like we skipped a season. Spring was barely here, with all these weird cold fronts that happened when we were supposed to have cool weather. It’s like it went from winter to summer without any notice! While I can’t get spring back, might as well revel in the summer.

To me, summer equals refreshment. Not so much with the weather but with food. It’s the best time to enjoy seasonal offerings like fresh fruits and vegetables when they’re in their prime. While I patiently wait for my seasonal farmer’s market to come back for the season, I thought about making some scones.

IMG_3684A

Normal people usually avoid turning on their ovens during the summer. I am (apparently) not normal. I love scones, and more in the summer. I got my first taste of scones at my local farmer’s market. One of the little booths is from a bakery, and they have a ton of freshly baked goods. Anything from fresh bread, muffins, and cookies, to fresh honey and jam. My sister and I used to get their giant peanut butter cookies, courtesy of my mom when she used to do the shopping. When my sister and I started going, we decided to try all the other things up for sale.

One of the first things we tried were her pumpkin scones. They were moist, flaky, and warm. It was weird having a fall offering in the middle of a sweltering July but it was so good! It had that essential scone taste. It’s weird to describe but good scones have this like, signature taste. It’s the one thing that identifies a good scone from a biscuit (because you knew scones and biscuits were related, right?) I spent quite a bit of time trying to figure out what the hell was the product of that ~taste~ and realized the common denominators in scone recipes: cream and butter.

The key to scones (and biscuits) is cold cream and butter. Super simple and super essential. Both of these fats need to be cold when incorporating because they’ll help create those flaky and delicious layers found in scones (and biscuits). Once I figured that out, I thought about what different kinds of flavors I can stuff in a basic recipe. Like a sign from the food blogger heavens, Deb (from Smitten Kitchen) posted this the other day. And just like that, I was making coconut lime scones.

Coconut and lime go SO WELL together. Like, you have no idea. Bonus if the coconut is toasted. Now, think about those flavors; enveloped in a neat package filled with butter and heavy cream, and iced with a coconut lime glaze. Close your eyes and imagine the flaky and buttery layers, hiding a tropical paradise in every bite. Can you taste the vacation in your mouth? Because that was me with these scones. The tart and nutty flavors of this scone made up for the fact that I actually had to turn on my oven to make them. While they may work better with a cup of coffee or something, I would not have minded a lovely cocktail to go with them (piña colada anyone?) I totally won’t judge you if you do 😉

IMG_3677A

Coconut Lime Scones – adapted from King Arthur Flour

Makes about 16 scones

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup whole wheat flour
  • 1/3 cup sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) cold, unsalted butter
  • 2 cups shredded sweetened coconut, toasted
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons lime zest
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup cold heavy cream

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Line two baking sheets with parchment.  In a large mixing bowl, whisk together all the dry ingredients. Cut in the butter just until the mixture is unevenly crumbly; it’s OK for some larger chunks of butter to remain unincorporated. Stir in the cooled toasted coconut.
  2. In a separate mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs, lime zest and juice, vanilla, and cream. Add the liquid ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir until all is moistened and holds together.
  3. Using a muffin scoop or a large spoon, scoop mounds of dough onto the prepped baking sheets. Bake the scones 25-30 minutes, or until lightly browned. Remove them from the oven and let them sit for 4 to 5 minutes to firm before removing them from the pan. Glaze, if desired, once completely cooled.

Lucy’s Tips:

  • Freeze the stick of butter for a couple hours and shred it into the dry ingredients. Super nifty tip that helps keep the butter super cold and requires less handiwork. 
  • For the glaze, I mixed about 1/2 cup of powdered sugar, freshly squeezed lime juice, a touch of heavy cream, about 1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract and three drops of coconut extract. It made enough to glaze about six scones. 
  • If the dough seems too wet or soft, freeze the scooped scones for about 10 minutes before baking; helps them keep their composure and aids in making them super flaky.